St. Januarius: Saint of the Day for Saturday, September 19, 2020

St. Januarius was born in Italy and was bishop of Benevento during the Emperor Diocletion persecution. Bishop Januarius went to visit two deacons and two laymen in prison. He was then also imprison along with his deacon and lector. They were thrown to the wild beasts, but when the animals did not attack them, they were beheaded. What is believed to be Januarius’ blood is kept in Naples, as a relic. It liquifies and bubbles when exposed in the cathedral. Scientists have not been able to explain …

St. Januarius: Saint of the Day for Saturday, September 19, 2020

St. Januarius was born in Italy and was bishop of Benevento during the Emperor Diocletion persecution. Bishop Januarius went to visit two deacons and two laymen in prison. He was then also imprison along with his deacon and lector. They were thrown to the wild beasts, but when the animals did not attack them, they were beheaded. What is believed to be Januarius’ blood is kept in Naples, as a relic. It liquifies and bubbles when exposed in the cathedral. Scientists have not been able to explain …

St. Januarius: Saint of the Day for Saturday, September 19, 2020

St. Januarius was born in Italy and was bishop of Benevento during the Emperor Diocletion persecution. Bishop Januarius went to visit two deacons and two laymen in prison. He was then also imprison along with his deacon and lector. They were thrown to the wild beasts, but when the animals did not attack them, they were beheaded. What is believed to be Januarius’ blood is kept in Naples, as a relic. It liquifies and bubbles when exposed in the cathedral. Scientists have not been able to explain …

Friday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time

Reading 1 1 COR 15:12-20

Brothers and sisters:
If Christ is preached as raised from the dead,
how can some among you say there is no resurrection of the dead?
If there is no resurrection of the dead,
then neither has Christ been raised.
And if Christ has not been raised, then empty too is our preaching;
empty, too, your faith.
Then we are also false witnesses to God,
because we testified against God that he raised Christ,
whom he did not raise if in fact the dead are not raised.
For if the dead are not raised, neither has Christ been raised,
and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is vain;
you are still in your sins.
Then those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.
If for this life only we have hoped in Christ,
we are the most pitiable people of all.

But now Christ has been raised from the dead,
the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.
 

Responsorial Psalm PS 17:1BCD, 6-7, 8B AND 15

R. (15b) Lord, when your glory appears, my joy will be full.
Hear, O LORD, a just suit;
attend to my outcry;
hearken to my prayer from lips without deceit. 
R. Lord, when your glory appears, my joy will be full.
I call upon you, for you will answer me, O God; 
incline your ear to me; hear my word.
Show your wondrous mercies,
O savior of those who flee 
from their foes to refuge at your right hand.
R. Lord, when your glory appears, my joy will be full.
Hide me in the shadow of your wings,
But I in justice shall behold your face;
on waking, I shall be content in your presence.
R. Lord, when your glory appears, my joy will be full.

 

 

Alleluia MT 11:25

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth;
you have revealed to little ones the mysteries of the Kingdom.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel LK 8:1-3

Jesus journeyed from one town and village to another,
preaching and proclaiming the good news of the Kingdom of God.
Accompanying him were the Twelve
and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities,
Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out,
Joanna, the wife of Herod’s steward Chuza,
Susanna, and many others
who provided for them out of their resources.

– – –

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved. Neither this work nor any part of it may be reproduced, distributed, performed or displayed in any medium, including electronic or digital, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

How Will You Serve In The Body Of Christ?

When Jesus traveled from town to town, proclaiming the Good News, He was rarely alone. In addition to His twelve apostles, who usually accompanied Jesus in His travels, women were also present. In today’s Gospel, we hear about the famous Mary Magdalene, as well as Joanna and Susanna. Their role in the group was two-fold: they were invited to listen to the preaching of the Master, and in exchange, they saw to the physical needs of the group, ensuring that everyone was fed and cared for.

Jesus Christ accepted all kinds of people into His group. It didn’t matter what kind of baggage you brought with you, or what you had done in the past. It didn’t matter what kind of job you had, or how much money you made. Tax collector? Not a problem. Made some poor life choices? Don’t let them stand in your way. Homemaker? There’s room for you here too. Formerly possessed by seven demons? Welcome home. All are welcome here, even you and me. Especially you and me.

There is room for all of us in the Body of Christ. Jesus knows what is on our hearts, and as long as our repentance is sincere, our past sins will never be an obstacle to walking with Christ. Christ’s love of us is transformative. He can turn a hotheaded fisherman into a leader, a possessed woman into a devout disciple, a tax collector into an evangelist. We are washed clean, our sins are erased, and we are born again in Christ. We are a new creation, and our spot in the Body of Christ is already paid for. We just need to claim it as our own.

In today’s Gospel, we see that Christ has called all people to follow Him. Men and women become brothers and sisters. Sinners become saints. The rejected ones become the redeemed. We are all children of God, and we are all called to be disciples of Christ. We are all invited to play our role in the Body of Christ. Some of us will preach and teach. Others will heal and protect. Still others will serve and nurture. There is a place for all of us, no matter what our talents and abilities might be, and no matter where we might have come from. We are all needed. We are all wanted. We are all loved. We are all called. The remaining question is, how will you serve in the Body of Christ?

Contact the author

Shannon Whitmore currently lives in northwestern Virginia with her husband, Andrew, and their two children, John and Felicity. When she is not caring for her children, Shannon enjoys writing for her blog, Love in the Little Things, reading fiction, and freelance writing. She has experience serving in the areas of youth ministry, religious education, sacramental preparation, and marriage enrichment.

How Will You Serve In The Body Of Christ?

When Jesus traveled from town to town, proclaiming the Good News, He was rarely alone. In addition to His twelve apostles, who usually accompanied Jesus in His travels, women were also present. In today’s Gospel, we hear about the famous Mary Magdalene, as well as Joanna and Susanna. Their role in the group was two-fold: they were invited to listen to the preaching of the Master, and in exchange, they saw to the physical needs of the group, ensuring that everyone was fed and cared for.

Jesus Christ accepted all kinds of people into His group. It didn’t matter what kind of baggage you brought with you, or what you had done in the past. It didn’t matter what kind of job you had, or how much money you made. Tax collector? Not a problem. Made some poor life choices? Don’t let them stand in your way. Homemaker? There’s room for you here too. Formerly possessed by seven demons? Welcome home. All are welcome here, even you and me. Especially you and me.

There is room for all of us in the Body of Christ. Jesus knows what is on our hearts, and as long as our repentance is sincere, our past sins will never be an obstacle to walking with Christ. Christ’s love of us is transformative. He can turn a hotheaded fisherman into a leader, a possessed woman into a devout disciple, a tax collector into an evangelist. We are washed clean, our sins are erased, and we are born again in Christ. We are a new creation, and our spot in the Body of Christ is already paid for. We just need to claim it as our own.

In today’s Gospel, we see that Christ has called all people to follow Him. Men and women become brothers and sisters. Sinners become saints. The rejected ones become the redeemed. We are all children of God, and we are all called to be disciples of Christ. We are all invited to play our role in the Body of Christ. Some of us will preach and teach. Others will heal and protect. Still others will serve and nurture. There is a place for all of us, no matter what our talents and abilities might be, and no matter where we might have come from. We are all needed. We are all wanted. We are all loved. We are all called. The remaining question is, how will you serve in the Body of Christ?

Contact the author

Shannon Whitmore currently lives in northwestern Virginia with her husband, Andrew, and their two children, John and Felicity. When she is not caring for her children, Shannon enjoys writing for her blog, Love in the Little Things, reading fiction, and freelance writing. She has experience serving in the areas of youth ministry, religious education, sacramental preparation, and marriage enrichment.

How Will You Serve In The Body Of Christ?

When Jesus traveled from town to town, proclaiming the Good News, He was rarely alone. In addition to His twelve apostles, who usually accompanied Jesus in His travels, women were also present. In today’s Gospel, we hear about the famous Mary Magdalene, as well as Joanna and Susanna. Their role in the group was two-fold: they were invited to listen to the preaching of the Master, and in exchange, they saw to the physical needs of the group, ensuring that everyone was fed and cared for.

Jesus Christ accepted all kinds of people into His group. It didn’t matter what kind of baggage you brought with you, or what you had done in the past. It didn’t matter what kind of job you had, or how much money you made. Tax collector? Not a problem. Made some poor life choices? Don’t let them stand in your way. Homemaker? There’s room for you here too. Formerly possessed by seven demons? Welcome home. All are welcome here, even you and me. Especially you and me.

There is room for all of us in the Body of Christ. Jesus knows what is on our hearts, and as long as our repentance is sincere, our past sins will never be an obstacle to walking with Christ. Christ’s love of us is transformative. He can turn a hotheaded fisherman into a leader, a possessed woman into a devout disciple, a tax collector into an evangelist. We are washed clean, our sins are erased, and we are born again in Christ. We are a new creation, and our spot in the Body of Christ is already paid for. We just need to claim it as our own.

In today’s Gospel, we see that Christ has called all people to follow Him. Men and women become brothers and sisters. Sinners become saints. The rejected ones become the redeemed. We are all children of God, and we are all called to be disciples of Christ. We are all invited to play our role in the Body of Christ. Some of us will preach and teach. Others will heal and protect. Still others will serve and nurture. There is a place for all of us, no matter what our talents and abilities might be, and no matter where we might have come from. We are all needed. We are all wanted. We are all loved. We are all called. The remaining question is, how will you serve in the Body of Christ?

Contact the author

Shannon Whitmore currently lives in northwestern Virginia with her husband, Andrew, and their two children, John and Felicity. When she is not caring for her children, Shannon enjoys writing for her blog, Love in the Little Things, reading fiction, and freelance writing. She has experience serving in the areas of youth ministry, religious education, sacramental preparation, and marriage enrichment.